Google DNS benchmarked. And it's s l o w .

It’s official, Google has taken over the internet.

If you missed the news, or just don’t care, Google announced the launch of their new DNS service.  In their own words, you could think of DNS as “the switchboard of the Internet”.  The move to offer this new service is a vertically integrated move for Google to control yet more bits of your overall interneting experience.

Recently, the Googs has publicly proclaimed their interest in making the internet a faster place to be.  The introduction of Google DNS seems to be a step towards making that a reality.  What—reality?  Well, i was curious to see how the Google’s new DNS servers measured up to existing DNS providers.  So i fired up namebench and plugged the Google DNS server addys into it.  Here’s what i got:

DNS Response Time Graph

DNS Response Time Graph

Highlighted are the Google servers.  Not too impressive, huh?  Contributing factors to this data are my admittedly crappy Qwest DSL connection, and location.  But even so, it looks like the service is not running at top speed just yet, so hold off on switching your nameservers.  Perhaps with time the server response will improve?

Google DNS Server Test

Google DNS Server Test

The above screenshot shows test details for the Google DNS servers.  Of note from this data are the “shares cache with” lines in the right column.  These are DNS servers that have essentially been subsumed by the Google’s new DNS servers.  Dwarfed, overshadowed, gobbled up.

If you are interested in testing the Goolge DNS servers from your own connection here are the nameserver addresses to use:

  • 8.8.8.8
  • 8.8.4.4

Easy, right?  I’ll give them that much.  You can use the previously mentioned namebench, which tests your existing nameservers or any you provide against others in your area as well as big ones like OpenDNS and UltraDNS.  If you’re CLI inclined then a simple traceroute will show you every hop from your ‘puter to the WWW and everything along the way.  Like this:

$ traceroute -v 8.8.8.8

You can also perform a traceroute using the Network Utility app included in OS X (it’s in Applications/Utilities).

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